1963-2013 - 50 years of Research for Social Change

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Publications


UNRISD pursues an active and varied publications programme, which includes in-house and commercially published books, special reports, programme and occasional papers, as well as newsletters on specific events and the Institute’s work in general.

This section provides a catalogue of our publications, and free online access to many of them. We encourage you to subscribe to our free email alerts service to be informed when new publications are posted on this Web site.

Highlights...

The Philippines: The Political Economy of Financing Children’s Rights through Extractive Industries

February 2016

The Philippines: The Political Economy of Financing Children’s Rights through Extractive Industries

Author: Jewellord Nem Singh

This paper provides a detailed analysis of two key aspects of mining governance in the Philippines: the political challenges in realizing a more positive role for extractive industries (EI) in social development, particularly in promoting children’s rights and children’s welfare; and the political economy dynamics that might underpin the creation of a welfare regime able to sustain social investments for children. The findings suggest that in the Philippine context, where the expansion of the EI sector is contested in the public domain, the link between mining governance and the promotion and protection of children’s rights is not necessarily straightforward. Yet the resurgence of high prices and the continuing foreign investment in EI means that there is now a political opportunity for relevant stakeholders to make a compelling argument for the need to ring-fence mineral rents for social investments in children and young people.

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How Can Cryptocurrency and Blockchain Technology Play a Role in Building Social and Solidarity Finance?

February 2016

How Can Cryptocurrency and Blockchain Technology Play a Role in Building Social and Solidarity Finance?

Author: Brett Scott

The decentralized digital currency Bitcoin—and its underlying “blockchain” technology—has created much excitement in the technology community, but its potential for building truly empowering social and solidarity-based finance has yet to be tested. This paper provides a primer on the basics of Bitcoin and discusses the existent narratives about the technology’s potential to facilitate remittances, financial inclusion, cooperative structures and even micro-insurance systems. It also flags up potential points of concern and conflict.It concludes with suggestions for future research.

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New Alliances for Social Development: Mobilizing Resources in Nicaragua

December 2015

New Alliances for Social Development: Mobilizing Resources in Nicaragua

In the face of dwindling development assistance from traditional donors, Nicaragua has turned to new partnerships with the governments of Venezuela, Brazil and China to finance the adoption of much-needed social programmes. But these relationships can be fragile, and despite frequent tax reforms the Nicaraguan government has not managed to provide a stable domestic resource base to underpin its social contract. So how can sustainable financing for social policies be ensured?

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Civil Society Steps Up: New Directions in Social Policy in the Russian Federation

December 2015

Civil Society Steps Up: New Directions in Social Policy in the Russian Federation

New legislation in Russia has opened up a space for civil society organizations (CSOs) to work in partnership with the state. Does this mean that CSOs will emerge as a new force in Russian social policy design and implementation? Might it help overcome obstacles that have hindered Russian social policy performance? This case study, part of the UNRISD research project New Directions in Social Policy: Alternatives from and for the Global South, explores the current social policy shift in the Russian Federation.

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Multiple Forms of Migrant Precarity: Beyond

December 2015

Multiple Forms of Migrant Precarity: Beyond "Management" of Migration to an Integrated Rights-Based Approach

In recent months, the media have been flooded with stories of migrants and refugees fleeing under great personal risk and hardship from war, conflict and poverty. The initial wave of solidarity and empathy by European citizens has quickly given way to policy approaches and a public attitude of crisis management and unfruitful attempts at burden sharing. The magnitude of what has been termed the “migrant crisis” requires an informed debate and careful analysis of the potential implications of current policy responses. With this mind, researchers, activists and experts from UN organizations met to discuss the outstanding challenges to overcoming migrant precarity and moving a rights-based migration agenda forward.

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