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Back | Programme Area: Social Dimensions of Sustainable Development

Localizing the SDGs through Social and Solidarity Economy for Sustainable and Resilient Societies—An Official Side Event of the 2018 High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development

Date: 17 Jul 2018

  • Time: 10.00-12.00
  • Location: Church Center of the United Nations (2nd Floor), 777 United Nations Plaza, New York, NY 10017
  • Donor(s): Global Social Economy Forum
  • Counterpart(s): UN-DESA Department for Inclusive Social Development, Global Social Economy Forum

Localizing the SDGs through Social and Solidarity Economy for Sustainable and Resilient Societies—An Official Side Event of the 2018 High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development
As an integrated and balanced approach to development, social and solidarity economy (SSE) has the potential to function as an intelligent means of localizing the 2030 Agenda.

At this side event, speakers presented new research evidence and local government experience of SSE, and the enabling conditions—such as institutional arrangements, political forces and economic possibilities—which are needed for it to succeed in diverse contexts.


In keeping with the mandate of the HPLF to provide guidance and recommendations on implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the panellists at this event shared knowledge and experience on how SE is contributing to realizing the 2030 Agenda’s vision of transformation, and achieving the goals and targets at the local level, in particular in cities.



Programme




Moderator Laurence Kwark, Secretary-General of the Global Social Economy Forum (GSEF) ► Listen to the introduction

Opening remarks
Speakers

Background


Several characteristics of the social and solidarity economy (SSE) mean that it aligns well with the integrated nature of the SDGs, and with building sustainable and resilient societies from the local level up. SSE is grounded in the principles of solidarity, social cohesion and collective action; activities build and strengthen localized circuits of production, exchange and consumption; environmental and social costs are internalized rather than externalized; and it is rooted in the local political economy.

Localizing the SDGs means translating them from a global vision into local realities for communities, households and individuals. Goals and targets need to be adapted to local realities, needs and priorities. But for that to be done, certain enabling conditions—related to institutional arrangements, political forces and economic possibilities—need to be present. Speakers at the side event will discuss the role of SSE in providing such conditions in diverse contexts. They will explore concrete cases where SSE has contributed to building more inclusive, democratic, resilient and sustainable communities, and how these experiences can be leveraged towards implementation of the SDGs.