1963-2013 - 50 years of Research for Social Change

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Videos

  • 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development
  • Combating Poverty and Inequality
  • Financing for Development
  • Food Security
  • Green Economy and Sustainable Development
  • Gender
  •  Women Workers and the Politics of Claims-Making in a Globalized Economy (16 Aug 2016)
    Naila Kabeer summarizes the politics of claims-making by and on behalf of women workers in the Global South in the context of a globalized economy. Three categories of women workers are covered: those working in global value chains, those working for domestic markets and those working as cross-border migrants. She considers the following questions. What kinds of claims are prioritized in relation to women workers? Who is making the claims and to whom are they addressed? What strategies are pursued to advance claims? Which claims are heard and acted on, and which go unheard?

  •  Women's Mobilization on Violence Against Women in India (7 Sep 2016)
    The brutal sexual abuse of a 23-year-old student in India in 2012 prompted massive protests, especially among feminist groups, leading not only to responsive legal action from the government but also the re-shaping of discourse around rape. In this presentation, Mubashira Zaidi, from the Institute of Social Studies Trust in New Delhi, presents the watershed moments of the anti-rape movement in India, analyses claims-making processes by women’s groups and oppositional discourses on rape and sexual assault from a legal perspective, and explores why “gender neutrality” is a contested term in Indian legislation.

  •  Claiming Domestic Workers’ Labour Rights in India (30 Aug 2016)
    Domestic work is a highly feminized sector, characterized by poor working conditions, lack of social security, lack of access to education and precarity of employment. In this presentation, Anweshaa Ghosh, from the Institute of Social Studies Trust in New Delhi, presents the findings of a study looking at women's mobilization for domestic workers' rights in India. Anweshaa Ghosh reviews chronologically key moments of claims-making by women’s groups, explores how different actors pressured for policy change, and presents major achievements while contrasting them against the many challenges still unsolved, including class and cast discrimination.

  •  Gender and the SDGs: A Feminist Overview (22 Apr 2016)
    How do the Sustainable Development Goals reflect current feminist agendas? Valeria Esquivel, Research Coordinator of the Gender and Development Programme at UNRISD, unpacks the gender dimensions in the SDGs, focusing on the strengths and potential pitfalls in the 2030 Agenda. The presentation took place at Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals: Are the SDGs Good News for Women? , the Geneva launch of the Oxfam journal Gender & Development devoted to the Sustainable Development Goals, co-edited by Valeria Esquivel and Caroline Sweetman.

  •  From Vision to Reality: Which Policies to Achieve the SDGs? (22 Apr 2016)
    What policies are needed to achieve the vision of the SDGs? Seeking answers to this question, UNRISD Senior Research Associate Gabriele Koehler casts an expert eye over a range of existing international instruments and platforms to find a policy approach which combines human rights, gender equality and sustainability, as foreseen in Agenda 2030. The presentation took place at Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals: Are the SDGs Good News for Women? , the Geneva launch of the Oxfam journal Gender & Development devoted to the Sustainable Development Goals, co-edited by Valeria Esquivel and Caroline Sweetman.

  •  Pushing the Gender Metrics Agenda: Indicators for Gender Equality within the SDGs (22 Apr 2016)
    Now the race to produce indicators to measure the implementation of the SDGs has been all but completed, Rafael Diez de Medina, Director of the Department of Statistics at the International Labour Organization (ILO), reviews proceedings and points out where a hidden gender metrics agenda has been pushed forward in the process. The presentation took place at Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals: Are the SDGs Good News for Women? , the Geneva launch of the Oxfam journal Gender & Development devoted to the Sustainable Development Goals, co-edited by Valeria Esquivel and Caroline Sweetman.

  •  SDGs, Women and Rural Transformation in Least Developed Countries (22 Apr 2016)
    "Progress on gender issues is what will determine the success or failure of the SDGs", says Taffere Tesfachew, Director of the Division for Africa at the UNCTAD Least Developed Countries Programme. Find out why, particularly from the perspective of rural women living in the world's least developed countries. The presentation took place at Gender and the Sustainable Development Goals: Are the SDGs Good News for Women? , the Geneva launch of the Oxfam journal Gender & Development devoted to the Sustainable Development Goals, co-edited by Valeria Esquivel and Caroline Sweetman.

  •  Claiming Their Rights: How Women's Movements Mobilize for Policy Change (5 Nov 2015)
    In this UNRISD seminar, external project coordinator Nitya Rao presents the research findings from the UNRISD research project "When and Why do States Respond to Women's Claims? Understanding Gender-Egalitarian Policy Change in Asia". The project case studies include China, India and Indonesia.

  •  Substantive Equality for Women: Connecting Human Rights and Public Policy (Panel I) (14 Sep 2015)
    Watch human rights and policy specialists quit their silos and dialogue productively across disciplines in the first panel of the research-advocacy-policy workshop Substantive Equality for Women: Connecting Human Rights and Public Policy organized by UNRISD, UNWomen and OHCHR on 15 June 2015. Panellists include Farida Shaheed, Sandra Fredman and Lucinda O'Hanlon. Moderated by Nicole Ameline.

  •  Substantive Equality for Women: Transforming Work for Women's Rights (Panel II) (14 Sep 2015)
    Panellists at this roundtable include Sharan Burrows, Valeria Esquivel and Lene Wendland. Moderated by Shauna Olney.

  •  Substantive Equality for Women: Making Social Policy Work for Women (Panel III) (14 Sep 2015)
    Panellists at this roundtable include Frances Raday, Maxine Molyneux and Virginia Dandan. Moderated by Magdalena Sepulveda.

  •  Substantive Equality for Women: Towards an Enabling Macroeconomic Environment (Panel IV) (14 Sep 2015)
    Panellists include James Heintz, Isabel Ortiz and Kate Donald. Moderated by Susan Mathews.

  •  Women's Mobilization for Gender-Egalitarian Policy Change in the 20 Years since Beijing (19 May 2015)
    UNRISD organized a Side Event at the 59th Commission on the Status of Women in collaboration with the Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung (New York Office) as part of its activities in engaging with Beijing+20.

  •  Reinventing Social Contracts: Feminists, Rights and Power (10 Mar 2015)
    In this UNRISD Seminar with Gita Sen, Patricia Schulz and Roberto Bissio. In this UNRISD Seminar, Gita Sen and her co-panelists speak about the role of feminist movements in the remaking of social contracts. They help untangle some of the complex power relationships that need to be addressed if new social contracts are to fulfil the promise of human rights and gender justice.

  •  Regional Migration (28 Jan 2013)
    Bob Deacon talks about the importance regional migration. He was speaking at the policy forum A Rights-Based, Gender-Equitable Approach to the Regional Governance of Migration: An Elusive or Achievable Prospect? Solutions to the challenges of international labour migration are typically sought at the global level. But in practice, most developments related to migration governance have taken place at the national, bilateral and regional levels. The past few decades have seen many initiatives to remove barriers to intra-regional labour movements in Asia, Africa and Latin America. These have often had more ambitious, rights-based goals—at least on paper—than similar projects in developed regions. Yet implementation of these initiatives has been slow or non-existent, and often triggered other difficulties for migrants.

  •  Labor Exchange and Forced Migration (28 Jan 2013)
    Raúl Delgado Wise at the policy forum A Rights-Based, Gender-Equitable Approach to the Regional Governance of Migration: An Elusive or Achievable Prospect? Solutions to the challenges of international labour migration are typically sought at the global level. But in practice, most developments related to migration governance have taken place at the national, bilateral and regional levels. The past few decades have seen many initiatives to remove barriers to intra-regional labour movements in Asia, Africa and Latin America. These have often had more ambitious, rights-based goals—at least on paper—than similar projects in developed regions. Yet implementation of these initiatives has been slow or non-existent, and often triggered other difficulties for migrants.

  •  Migrant Domestic Workers' Rights (28 Jan 2013)
    Karin Pape talks about the challenges facing migrant domestic workers. She was speaking at an UNRISD policy forum on A Rights-Based, Gender-Equitable Approach to the Regional Governance of Migration: An Elusive or Achievable Prospect? Solutions to the challenges of international labour migration are typically sought at the global level. But in practice, most developments related to migration governance have taken place at the national, bilateral and regional levels. The past few decades have seen many initiatives to remove barriers to intra-regional labour movements in Asia, Africa and Latin America. These have often had more ambitious, rights-based goals—at least on paper—than similar projects in developed regions. Yet implementation of these initiatives has been slow or non-existent, and often triggered other difficulties for migrants. This policy forum brought together a panel of experts from diverse fields and professional experience to discuss the status quo and future potential of the regional governance of migration.

  •  The Migrant Workers Convention (28 Jan 2013)
    Jakob Schneider talks about the Migrant Workers Convention at the policy forum A Rights-Based, Gender-Equitable Approach to the Regional Governance of Migration: An Elusive or Achievable Prospect? Solutions to the challenges of international labour migration are typically sought at the global level. But in practice, most developments related to migration governance have taken place at the national, bilateral and regional levels. The past few decades have seen many initiatives to remove barriers to intra-regional labour movements in Asia, Africa and Latin America. These have often had more ambitious, rights-based goals—at least on paper—than similar projects in developed regions. Yet implementation of these initiatives has been slow or non-existent, and often triggered other difficulties for migrants.

  •  The Feminization of Migration (28 Jan 2013)
    Christine Verschuur talks about the feminization of migration at an UNRISD policy forum on A Rights-Based, Gender-Equitable Approach to the Regional Governance of Migration: An Elusive or Achievable Prospect? Solutions to the challenges of international labour migration are typically sought at the global level. But in practice, most developments related to migration governance have taken place at the national, bilateral and regional levels. The past few decades have seen many initiatives to remove barriers to intra-regional labour movements in Asia, Africa and Latin America. These have often had more ambitious, rights-based goals—at least on paper—than similar projects in developed regions. Yet implementation of these initiatives has been slow or non-existent, and often triggered other difficulties for migrants. This policy forum brought together a panel of experts from diverse fields and professional experience to discuss the status quo and future potential of the regional governance of migration.

  •  International Migration Law and Human Rights (28 Jan 2013)
    Kristina Touzenis talks about the rights of migrants at an UNRISD policy forum on A Rights-Based, Gender-Equitable Approach to the Regional Governance of Migration: An Elusive or Achievable Prospect? Solutions to the challenges of international labour migration are typically sought at the global level. But in practice, most developments related to migration governance have taken place at the national, bilateral and regional levels. The past few decades have seen many initiatives to remove barriers to intra-regional labour movements in Asia, Africa and Latin America. These have often had more ambitious, rights-based goals—at least on paper—than similar projects in developed regions. Yet implementation of these initiatives has been slow or non-existent, and often triggered other difficulties for migrants. This policy forum brought together a panel of experts from diverse fields and professional experience to discuss the status quo and future potential of the regional governance of migration.

  •  Multiple Global Crises and Gender: Rethinking Alternative Paths for Development--Towards Pro-Poor Growth (25 Jun 2012)
    “The process of poverty removal itself can be an engine of growth, leading to growth that bubbles up rather than trickles down” – Devaki Jain.

    This is the first in a series of three videos based on footage from the UNRISD Seminar Series event. Does a country need to be rich in order for women and society to advance? Is development a synonym for economic growth? Watch the seminar highlights to find out more. This video features Devaki Jain (founder of the Institute of Social Studies, Delhi), Mariama Williams (South Center) and UNRISD Director Sarah Cook.

  •  Multiple Global Crises and Gender: Rethinking Alternative Paths for Development--A Call for New Leadership (25 Jun 2012)
    “The world is in steep crisis. These crises are evidence of systemic government, market and institutional failure” - Mariama Williams.

    This is the second in a series of three videos based on footage from the UNRISD Seminar Series event. Is it enough to simply reach into the old toolbox of macroeconomic thinking? As the world faces multiple crises, what alternative solutions and alternative pathways can be built upon to build lasting change that is both equitable and sustainable? Watch the highlights from this event for more on the participants’ take on this. This video features Mariama Williams (South Center), Naoko Otobe (International Labour Organization) and UNRISD Director Sarah Cook.

  •  Multiple Global Crises and Gender: Rethinking Alternative Paths for Development--Feminist Solutions (25 Jun 2012)
    "Feminists have very practical and operational things to say about fiscal policy, monetary policy and trade policy" – Mariama Williams.

    This is the last in a series of three videos based on footage from the UNRISD Seminar Series event. In the context of the global “multiple crises” of food, fuel, finance and jobs, the flaws in the current patterns of development are undeniable - especially for women. These crises have major economic and social implications, and the underlying, deep-seated problems of growing inequality are not being sufficiently addressed. Understanding and harvesting feminist knowledge, these speakers suggest, is increasingly critical to addressing these crises. This video features Devaki Jain (founder of the Institute of Social Studies, Delhi), Mariama Williams (South Center) and Naoko Otobe (Senior Employment Specialist and Gender and Employment Coordinator at the ILO).

  • Knowledge and Ideas; Research in the UN System
  • Migration
  • Precarious Employment and Basic Income
  • Social and Solidarity Economy
  • Social Policy
  • Social Protection and Social Security
  • UNRISD Seminar Series