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UNRISD Researcher Gives Keynote at Jakarta Conference on Child Poverty and Social Protection

10 Sep 2013


UNRISD Researcher Gives Keynote at Jakarta Conference on Child Poverty and Social Protection
UNRISD Research Coordinator Katja Hujo delivered the keynote speech at the Conference on Child Poverty and Social Protection, organized by the SMERU Research Institute, the Indonesian National Development Planning Agency (BAPPENAS) and UNICEF. The conference took place in Jakarta, Indonesia on 10-11 September 2013.

Katja Hujos’s keynote speech focused on how a transformative approach to social policy, including social protection programmes, can support a process of social and economic change towards better societies, placing children’s rights and well-being at the core of national development strategies.

The conference brought together researchers, policy makers and practitioners to discuss child poverty in relation with such issues as integrated social protection and the impact of HIV. Inclusive social protection and creating an enabling environment for social protection were the subject of two of the ten parallel sessions. Each day was concluded with a policy discussion between representatives of the Indonesian government, international agencies and research groups.

High-level representatives of the Indonesian government and UNICEF attended the conference. The opening remarks were delivered by:
  • Angela Kearney (Unicef Indonesia Representative)
  • Salim Segaf Al Jufri (Minister for Social Affairs)
  • Linda Amalia Sari Gumelar (Minister for Women Empowerment and Child Protection)
  • Armida S. Alisjahbana (Minister for National Development Planning/Head of Bappenas)

For more information about the conference, see the SMERU website.

For more about UNRISD’s work on children’s rights and well-being, see our research project Mobilizing Revenues from Extractive Industries: Protecting and Promoting Children’s Rights and Well-Being in Resource-Rich Countries.