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UNRISD Collaborating Researchers Among “Most Influential in 2014”

21 Nov 2014


UNRISD Collaborating Researchers Among “Most Influential in 2014”
Three of our Collaborating Researchers have been recognized as among the “50 Most Influential Latin-American Intellectuals of 2014”, according to a list established by ESGLOBAL, a leading internet source of analysis of world events.

“I feel honoured to be in the company of so many famous Hispanic-American intellectuals,” said Carmelo Mesa-Lago, who collaborated with UNRISD on the Social Policy in a Development Context project and the flagship report Combating Poverty and Inequality. He is the author of over 90 books and around 300 articles and chapters in books on social security and health care, and comparative economic systems, published in 7 languages in 34 countries.

Manuel Castells contributed to the UNRISD project Information Technologies and Social Development (2000-2005), writing on Information Technology, Globalization and Social Development. He has been professor at the University of California—Berkeley, the Open University of Catalonia (UOC), and the Annenberg School for Communication (University of Southern California). Since 2008 he has been a member of the governing board of the European Institute of Innovation and Technology.

Rodolfo Stavenhagen collaborated with UNRISD in the 1990s, coordinating the projects Ethnic Conflict and Development (1990-1993) and Racism and Public Policy (2000-2001). At the time of his collaboration with UNRISD, he was the UN Special Rapporteur on the Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms of Indigenous peoples. He also served on the UNRISD Board between 1975 and 1979.

We would like to heartily congratulate our Collaborating Researchers on this recognition. ESGLOBAL is also inviting readers to contribute to a discussion of their list, for example suggesting who you think is missing or pointing out any biases. Add your thoughts by visiting their announcement.

Photo by Scott Cresswell (CC BY 2.0)